Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Today I’m going to show you how I made this cute fox towel. Hooded towels are pretty easy to sew up and are great for toddlers and older kids who have outgrown their hooded baby towels.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

We have included a free pattern for this towel. When  you print it out, make sure that you are printing at 100% and check your 1″ square to make sure that it printed at the correct size.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Let’s get started!

 

What You Need:

One full size towel

One hand towel of a matching color

1/4 yard of white cotton fabric

A bit of black fabric for the nose

2 black buttons for eyes

1/2″ double fold bias tape (enough to go around the front of the hood, or the entire towel if preferred)

Fusible Web

Interfacing

You will also need the pattern pieces…

Download this tutorial and the pattern pieces free here

 

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

The first thing to do is print out your pattern and cut your front and back hood pieces as well as your main ear peices from the hand towel. Be careful in placing the pattern pieces so that you can fit all four of them on the one hand towel. Next cut out your muzzle, nose, and center ear pattern pieces and trace them onto the smooth side of your fusible web. Cut out your traced pieces (you don’t have to be precise at this point as shown above) and iron them onto your cotton fabric, following the directions on the package. The ear and whisker pieces will go on the white fabric and the nose will go on the black fabric.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Cut out all of the pieces from your fabric. Starting with the center ear piece , remove the backing and iron it onto the right side of one of your main ear pieces. Topstitch around the ear using a zig zag stitch. I set my stitch with a width of 3 and a length under 1. This will vary by machine and preference, so you might want to test on a scrap piece. Repeat for the other ear.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

You may want to add interfacing to the back side of your ear at this point to help them stand up straight. Cut a piece of interfacing that matches your main ear piece and iron to the wrong side of the fabric, following the directions on the package. Repeat with the other ear. Now, take one of your back ear pieces and place it on the front ear piece that you just added the white to, with right sides together. (If you added interfacing, this means it will be showing when you sew). Sew around the two sides with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Leave the bottom of the ear open.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Clip the tip of your ear, being careful not to cut through your stitches.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Flip right side out and poke out the tip of the ear. Repeat for the other ear.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Now we will work on the whisker pieces. Remove the backing of the fusible web and iron onto the front of your towel, leaving a narrow triangle between both. Topstitch around both whiskers using the same zig zag stitch as you did for the ear. When you get to the edge of the whiskers you will have to go slowly and leave your needle in your fabric, lift up your presser foot, and pivot your fabric around the tight turns. Lower  your presser foot and continue  sewing up to the next turn.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Repeat for the nose, using a black thread to topstitch. Leave your nose up 3/4″ from the bottom of your towel, as you will be adding bias tape here and you don’t want to cover your nose.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

We are now going to sew the hood pieces together using a French seam. Place the front and back hood pieces together with wrong sides facing. Place the ears face down on top of the towel where you like them. Angle them toward the center of the towel, so that when they are flipped up, they end up angled out. Pin your hood and ear pieces in place and sew around the outside edge of the hood with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Trim your seam allowance down by half.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Now, turn your hood inside out and sew around the edge from this side also using a 3/8″ seam allowance. Be careful that you are sewing on the outside of the seam you already created so that it won’t show when you flip your towel right side out. Now your seam will be encased and won’t be visible from either side.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

We can now attach our hood to the main towel. First, find the center of one of the long sides of your towel and mark it with a pin.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Find the center of your hood, and face down, match it with the center of your towel.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Pin your hood to your towel, keeping the hood 1/4″ to 1/8″ lower than the towel. Sew your hood to your towel with a 3/8″ seam allowance.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Lay your towel with the hood facing down.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Take the edge of your towel and fold it up so that it covers the seam and creates a straight line all the way across the top of your towel. Pin in place.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Sew 1/8″ from the edge, from one side of the hood to the other.

 

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

We will now add bias tape to the front of our hood. You can also choose to add it around the entire towel. I like my bias tape to match the whiskers, so I make my own. For a great tutorial on making your own, go here. Place one edge of your bias tape against the raw edge of the front hood piece, leaving about 1/2″ overlap on each end. Sew along the first fold, or 1/2″ in from the edge.

 

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Open your bias tape out and press. Now starting at one edge, take the extra 1/2″ you left and fold it in and under the bias tape.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Now fold your bias tape down along the first seam, or until it touches your towel.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

Now fold it over the raw edge and pin in place. Continue all the way down your hood, folding in the excess 1/2″ on the other side as well. Topstitch the bias tape down close to the edge, being careful to catch the front side of your bias as you go. Sometimes it’s best to pin and stitch from the front, so that you make sure the topstitching looks nice and even from the front.

Hooded Fox Towel Tutorial & Free Pattern

You’re fox towel is now done! Be sure to share with us on the Mummykins and Me Facebook Group.

 


Hooded Bunny Towel Tutorial and Free Pattern

When my son started growing out of his store bought hooded towels I decided to try my hand at making him some versions with regular sized towels and I was really happy with how they turned out. Now that my daughter is getting older, it’s time to start making some for her. Today I’m going to show you how to make a bunny hooded towel–perfect for Easter and also for gift giving!

Hooded Bunny Towel Tutorial and Free Pattern

Hooded Bunny Towel Tutorial and Free Pattern

They are pretty easy to make and are so warm and cozy when finished! First you will have to download the hood pattern as well as the bunny face applique pattern. Make sure you print at 100% and check the 1″ square on the pattern.

Hooded Bunny Towel Tutorial and Free Pattern

 

What You Need:

1 full size towel

1 hand towel in a matching color

2 buttons for eyes

A cotton fabric for the interior of the ears and the cheeks/nose

Fusible web

1/2″ double fold bias tape (See this tutorial on how to make your own)

You will also need the pattern pieces…

Download this tutorial and the pattern pieces free here

 

Getting Started:

First, cut out your front and back hood pieces from your hand towel. Make sure you place them right so that you can cut both pieces from the one hand towel.

Next, we will work on our appliques for the front of the hood.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Trace your muzzle and nose pieces onto the smooth side of your fusible web. (This is the picture of fox ears, but it’s the same concept). Cut around the pieces and place them with the fusible side down onto the fabric that you want to use. Iron on as recommended in the directions on the box.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Cut out your fabric pieces and peel the backing off the heart nose piece. Place on the muzzle and iron on as directed.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Next peel the backing off the muzzle piece and iron on to the center bottom of the front hood piece, leaving it up about 3/8″.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Next we are going to stitch around both the nose piece and the muzzle piece. I chose to use a pink thread around the nose and white around the muzzle, but you can use the same color if you want. Set your machine to zigzag with a width of about 3 and a length of around 1. This will vary by your machine and preference, so you may want to test your stitch on a scap piece before stitching on your towel. Stitch around your pieces, sewing about 3/4 of the way on the applique and 1/4 of the way onto the towel.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Next, using a washable fabric marker mark where you would like the mouth and whiskers. Using the same method as above, zigzag stitch over your markings.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Now we will construct the ears. Place a towel ear piece and a lining ear piece with right sides together. Stitch 1/4″ around the ear, leaving the bottom section open so you can turn it right side out. Depending on how thick your towel is, you may need to leave a bit of the side open as well so you pull the ear right side out. You can then just topstitch the side closed.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

We are going to create French seams on the towel hood, so place wrong sides of the front and back hood pieces together. Place the ears hanging down along the front as shown above. Pin the sides and ears in place and stitch around the outside edges of the hood with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Trim your seam allowance down by 1/2.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Now turn your hood inside out. Press if needed to keep the seam flat as we are now going to sew around the edges of the hood from this side. Sew with a 3/8″ seam allowance feeling as you go to make sure you are sewing on the outside of the inside seam so that it doesn’t show when you turn it right side out.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Your seam should now be hidden from both sides. Turn right side out and press if needed.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

We can now attach the hood to the towel. Mark the center of your towel with a pin along one of the long sides.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Place your hood face down and match the center of the hood with the center of the towel.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Pin together, placing the hood 1/8″ to 1/4″ below the towel.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Once your hood is sewn on, flip everything over so you are looking at the back of the hood.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Fold up the edge of the towel so it lies flat all the way across and hides the seam you just sewed.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Pin in place and sew 1/8″ from the top edge of the towel.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

The next step is to add bias tape to your hood. You can choose to just add it to the hood, or you can add it all the way around as I did in this version. First place your bias tape face down on your towel with raw edges lining up.

Hooded Towel Tutorial

Sew around the bias tape with a 1/2″ seam allowance, or along the closest fold mark. When you get to the corner, fold the bias tape back at a 45 degree angle and create a crease with your finger. Lay the bias tape straight again and sew up to your crease. Backstitch.

Hooded Towel Tutorial

Next, fold the bias tape back along the crease you created.

Hooded Towel Tutorial

And fold it straight along the edge, so that raw edges line up around the corner.

Hooded Towel Tutorial

Starting at the edge of the fabric, continue sewing until you get to the next corner or are finished.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

When you get to the end, fold one end back about 1/2″.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Place the other end over it and cut off excess. Continue sewing until you reach where you started.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Once you have it sewn all the way around, open up your bias tape and press out away from the towel.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Next take your bias tape and fold along the outside seam.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

Place it over the edge of the towel and pin in place.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

When you get to the corners, fold one side to the edge.

Hooded Towel Tutorial and Pattern

The tuck the other edge in and over the other so that it forms a 45 degree angle. on the corner. Sew close to the inside edge, attaching the bias tape all the way around.

And that’s it. You’re bunny towel is done! Make sure you share photos of our cute little bunnies on the Mummykins & Me Facebook page!

 

 


Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Have someone with a cool weather birthday that you need a present for? Infinity scarves are perfect! They’re quick, easy, and super cute too! Of course you can always do some selfish sewing and make one for yourself instead. In this Infinity Scarf Tutorial, I’m going to show you how to make one in either a child or adult size.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

I had to bribe my child with snacks to keep her scarf on, but it does look oh so adorable when it stays put. Hopefully you’ll have better luck!

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

You can use pretty much any kind of fabric for infinity scarves. I used a sweater knit from Sincerely Rylee on one side of my child scarf and a floral jersey rayon blend from Girl Charlee on the other side. For an adult version I used flannel on one side and fleece on the other.

One thing to note is that if you may want to adjust your measurements slightly if using a thinner or thicker fabric. Go a bit narrower and longer if using a super thick combo and a bit wider and shorter if using really thin, drapey fabric.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

So let’s get started!

 

You can either follow the tutorial directly on the blog below… or download the full tutorial in PDF format by going here

 

What You Need:

Adult Size: Two 60″ x 10″ strips of fabric; they can be the same or contrasting (one strip is for the outer, the other strip is for the inside/lining)

Child Size: Two 44″ x 8″ strips of fabric

Matching thread

 

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

You can either cut your fabric in one piece along the selvedge, or if it is directional, you can cut it along the cut edge and sew two shorter pieces together to get your total length. If you chose the latter, cut out two pieces that equal your total length, plus 3/8″ and lay them together with right sides facing. Sew along the short end with a 3/8″ seam allowance, as shown above, so you end up with one long piece. Do the same for your second piece if needed.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

After you have your two rectangles cut out, lay them together with right sides touching and pin along the top and bottom of the long sides. Sew along both long sides with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Tip: It is a good idea to sew the same direction for both sides in case your fabric walks on you. That way you can just trim the excess of the bottom edge and your fabric won’t be twisted.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Once you have a long tube, press your seams and then fold the tube inside itself, so right sides are touching.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Match up your seams and pin around the opening.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Sew around your opening, leaving 2″-3″ unsewn so you can turn your scarf right side out.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Turn your scarf right side out by pushing it through the opening  you left. The last step is to hand sew or top stitch the opening closed. All set! You now have an infinity scarf!


Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

I’m excited to share with you all this super easy tutorial for making felt animal masks. Plus you can find a free pattern for the four masks shown here. My kids loved them and had fun galloping around the house…I may have joined in the fun!

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Two of the patterns are woodland creatures — a fawn and a fox. You could add a cute bow to the deer, or some little antlers if you wanted to change it up a bit.

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

The other two patterns are a unicorn and a dragon. The unicorn can easily be made into a horse by omitting the horn. You could really make these your own by switching up the colors. One of the fun things about these is the ability to experiment.

So let’s get down to the tutorial.

 

What You Need:

  • Felt in the colors you prefer for your animal
  • Fusible Web/Iron-on Adhesive
  • Ribbon or elastic
  • Matching thread (optional)

You’ll also need to download the pattern pieces …

GET THE PATTERN HERE

Note – the pattern is  in PDF format. You’ll need the free Adobe Reader, or a similar program installed on to open it. Make sure to print it at 100% (no scaling) to get an accurately sized mask. There is a 1 inch square on the first page you can measure to check you’ve printed it at 100%.

 

Getting Started:

To start print out your pattern pieces. Make sure you print them at 100% and check the 1″ square to be sure they printed the correct size.

Cut out all of the pieces and trace them onto the smooth side of your fusible web, grouping them by color.

Felt Mask Tutorial

Cut around each color group and iron onto your felt. Check your iron settings aren’t too hot for your felt. I ironed on a cotton setting and had no problem. Also be sure to read the directions for your particular fusible web to be sure you are doing it correctly. One last note is to be sure that you are tracing and cutting out mirror images for items that go on both sides of the face like the whiskers on the fox.

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Cut out your felt pieces, peel off the backing from the fusible web and iron them onto the main mask piece one by one.

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

After you have ironed on all of the pieces, trace your main pattern pieces onto a piece of felt and cut out. You do not need fusible web on this pieces since it is already on the back of your other main piece.

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Cut a piece of ribbon to fit around your child’s head. I cut my ribbon to 38″. Place it down across the center of your pattern.

Felt Animal Masks Tutorial

Peel the backing off your main pattern piece and iron it onto the back piece, layering the ribbon between the pieces. Cut out the eyes, trim around the mask if any stray parts are showing.

Felt Animal Masks

If your ribbon will fray, fold the ends back 1/4″ and then a 1/4″ again and then sew close to the fold.

Felt Animal Mask Tutorial

The last step is optional, but I feel it gives it a more professional look. With matching thread, topstitch along your pattern pieces using a longer straight stitch. I set my length to 3. This also helps hold everything together.

And that’s it you’re done! We would love to see your versions. Show them off on the Mummykins and Me Facebook page!

 


Get inspired for 2016 SewingHappy New Year from everyone at Mummykins & Me!

Hope you had a lovely holiday period… filled with love, laughter, yummy food, great company and lots of sewing time 😉

Huge thank you to everyone who downloaded the ladies & child’s free Pretty Party Dress pattern back in December. You’ve made the most beautiful dresses and it’s been so much fun seeing your photos in front of Xmas trees, with family and at New Year parties.

(If you’ve not got your free Party Dress patterns yet, it’s still free for members of our Facebook group. Join at https://www.facebook.com/groups/mummykinsandme and then get the coupon code from the pinned post).

And on that note, who wants some 2016 sewing inspirations? I asked on our Facebook group what you’ve been sewing recently with Mummykins & Me patterns and here’s what you’ve been up to…! (hover your mouse over the picture to see who made it and what pattern it is)

Pretty Party Dresses by Glenda Morrow  Olivia Top by Samantha Jerrett  Mummy & me Pretty Party Dresses by Thérèse St-Arnaud  Easy Peasy Skirt by Glenda Morrow  Olivia top by Samantha Jerrett  Easy Peasy Skirt and Knotted Headband by Linette Torres  Olivia Top by Bec Munro  Matching Pretty Party Dresses by Thérèse St-Arnaud   Teatime Romper by Valerie Dufort  Pretty Party Dress by Leanne Miller   Olivia Top by Valerie Dufort  Pretty Party Dress by Thérèse St-Arnaud  Teatime Romper by Valerie Dufort  The Olivia Top by Sheri Oliveira   Pretty Party Dress by Meg Lane Grant   Olivia Top by Valerie Dufort Pretty Party Dress by Anita Prins Gorlitz  Emily Dress by Michelle Schuh Pretty Party Dress by Kelsey Dana Melillo  Pretty Party Dresses by Valerie Dufort  Olivia Top by Glenda Morrow  Pretty Party Dress by Glenda Morrow  Olivia Top by Linette Torres

Featured patterns – The Olivia, The Teatime Romper, Ladies Pretty Party Dress, Child’s Pretty Party Dress and The Emily.

Huge thank you to Leanne, Sheri, Anita, Therese, Kelsey, Meg, Bec, Samantha, Linette, Valerie, Michelle, and Glenda for sharing their lovely creations with us!

PS… Keep an eye out on our blog next week, our awesome new guest blogger will be posting the most adorable felt animal mask tutorial. I’ve tried it and my kids LOVE them. No sewing involved (unless you want to top stitch afterwards). Fab project for relaxing with in the evenings when the little ones are in bed … or if you’re feeling brave you could try it with them! Can’t wait.


Very exciting news… the all-new Olivia top pattern is now LIVE!

Totally updated and now with LONG sleeve version as well as the original short sleeve. Perfect for winter & fall. Layer-tastic. Plus it’s perfect for knit or cotton/woven fabric.

The pattern is on sale for a half price $3.50 (usually $7) until 10th October fromhttps://rebecca-page.com/product/girls-peasant-top-sewing-pattern/. Grab it now.

Here’s a taster of some of the GORGEOUS tester photos. They really did rock it. More to come over the next few days on our Facebook group.

Olivia short sleeve  Olivia short sleeve  Olivia long sleeve

Olivia long sleeve  Olivia short sleeve


This is just TOO cute. Just released an adorable ruffled diaper cover that goes perfectly with the Lucy dress.

This gorgeous combo is on sale for only $7 (that’s less than the dress on it’s own!) for the next week only. Snap it up quick folks! xx

 

Lucy_and_Ruffle_Bum  Robin Hodges - Lucy Test (10)   Shannyn Pool - Lucy test (5)  Amanda Rios - Lucy Test 3  Sheri Carter - Lucy Test 8


NEW VERSION – I’m so excited to let you know the all new Amy and Gracie patterns are now available!!

Lots and lots of edits later they are both digital (not hand-drawn) with more ease in the neck and arm holes and a super cute shorter tunic length. PLUS you now get ALL the sizes in one pattern.

** Limited time only – get them for $4 each **

AMY (bias edged tunic) – https://rebecca-page.com/product/quick-and-easy-pdf-pattern-reversible-cross-over-dress/
GRACIE (lace edged tunic) – https://rebecca-page.com/product/reversible-cross-over-dress-sewing-pattern/

I know I shouldn’t have favourites but I’m so in love with the Amy in particular! Check out these beautiful tester shots

PS… If you get the Amy, make sure to also download my free Bias Tape tutorial so you can get that gorgeous self-covered bias look.

Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding  Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding  Amy Cross over dress  Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding  Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding  Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding   Amy cross over open back dress with bias binding  Quick and easy PDF pattern
“Fav bit is the bias trim encasing all seams, makes for a neat product” – Aimee Domio, www.facebook.com/thelittlemaster

“This would be a cute pattern for fall layering, super versatile since it is reversible” – Anna Bruyer

“Very well written pattern, beginners would have no problem following. Buy it!” – Jennifer Ray, www.facebook.com/southernpridesewing

“Quick, easy sew with a cute outcome” – Kelly Ballou, www.facebook.com/sewalittleseam

“It is a quick pattern that is simple and great for beginners but leaves a lot of room to add embellishments for the advances seamstress” – Krystal Shearer

“I think its gorgeous, timeless design. Great for appliques in my opinion and layering for colder weather” – Lenka, https://www.facebook.com/tutubugabudhabi

“I love the finished pattern. But I really enjoy the simplicity of the pattern and instructions” – Irene Cottrell, www.facebook.com/lorettamaedesigns


Ever wanted to learn how to make DIY bias binding (also called bias tape)? It’s incredibly useful for professional finishes on such a variety of clothing, especially kids clothing! Well here’s a step by step guide…

Bias binding - download

 

First off… TERMINOLOGY

“Bias Binding” vs “Bias Tape” – These are the same thing, however in some parts of the world people call it bias binding (eg UK & NZ), whereas in other parts of the world people call it bias tape (eg USA and parts of Europe). I grew up in NZ and live in the UK so from here on I’ll refer to it as bias binding.

Single fold bias binding – Single-fold bias binding is strips of fabric which are cut on the bias, with each raw edge folded in toward the center (wrong sides together) and pressed.

Single fold bias binding has lots of uses. For example you’ll often find it on professionally stitched garments to cover up raw edges on the inside of armholes and waistbands.

Double fold bias binding – Double-fold bias binding is single fold bias binding that has been folded in half along its centreline.

Most of my patterns that use bias binding call for double fold bias binding.

My favourite use for double fold bias binding in children’s clothing is around any edge of the garment. For example around a hem or around an armhole. It’s fold goes over the raw edge of the garment so it’s totally enclosed once you stitch it on.

 

Let’s get going… CONSTRUCTION

STEP 1 – Cutting out

 1.1 1. 1 Wash & iron your fabric. Then lay the fabric so the raw edges are horizontal, and the selvedge is vertical.TIP – the raw edges are the edges that will fray if you pick at them. The selvedge edge is the one that won’t fray. It often looks a bit different and sometimes has writing or markings on it. You’ll see in the top right corner of this photo the selvedge for this fabric has the fabric companies logo on it.
 1.2 1.2 Fold the selvedge edge down to meet the raw edge so it forms a diagonal fold.
 1.3 1.3 Using a ruler, measure how wide you want the strip and cut it out.When you buy bias binding in stores or online, the width is usually talked about as if it was single fold bias binding. So 1 inch wide bias binding would be 1 inch if it was single fold, or ½ inch if it’s double fold.When you’re cutting out, measure double the finished width you want.EG

– for 1 inch wide single bias binding (or ½ inch wide double fold) cut your strip 2 inches wide.

– for 1 ½ inch wide single bias binding (or ¾ inch wide double fold) cut your strip 3 inches wide.

 

 1.4 1.4 Unfold the strip and check you’ve cut your strip the right width.If you are happy with the length of your strip of bias binding, move step 3.1.If you want a longer piece then continue on to step 1.5. 

1.5a(photo a – keep fabric flat)

1.5b(photo b – cutting lines)

1.5 Next use the strip you have just cut as a template for more.Keep your fabric flat (photo a) and lay the strip you’ve just cut on the fabric directly next to the diagonal edge and cut again.Keep moving the strip along and cut as many more as you need. See photo b for how you keep cutting more strips next to each other.

 

STEP 2 – Stitching several strips together

2.1c(photo c – before the cut) 

2.1d(photo d – after the cut)

 

2.1 Fold the bottom edge of each of your strips on a 45 degree angle and cut.See photo c for before, and photo d for after the 45 degree cut.
 2.2 2.2 Fold the top edge of each of your strips down at a 45 degree angle and cut.The top edges should now be cut exactly opposite to the bottom edges.
 2.3 2.3 Place one strip right side up vertically. Place another strip right side down horizontally. Make sure the pointy edges stick out slightly over the sides like in the photo (by approx ¼ inch each). Pin together.
 2.4 2.4 Stitch along the straight edge approx ¼ inch from the edge. Your stitching should run from the join of two strips of fabric on one side, to the join on the other side.
 2.5 2.5 Open the strips out and press the seam allowance to one side. Your strips should now be in a long straight line.If the two strips don’t align in one long straight strip of fabric, close the fabric back up how it was in step 2.4, cut the seam allowance off, realign your fabric and stitch it again.
 2.6 2.6 Snip the raw edge off that’s sticking out at the bottom of the diagonal.

 

 

STEP 3 – Pressing

 

 3.1 3.1 With wrong sides together, fold the strip in half lengthwise and press.
 3.2 3.2 Open the strip back out. Then fold each of the raw edges in to meet the centre fold that you just pressed in step 3.1. Press your new folds.For Single Fold Bias Binding – Press across the whole strip so you press out the fold you made in 3.1. You’ll be left with just the folds you made in this step. It’s now finished.For Double Fold Bias Binding – Continue on to step 3.3
 3.3 3.3 Fold the bias binding in half again down the centreline you made in step 3.1. Press. Your double fold bias binding is now finished.

 

 

 

All done!

Finished DIY bias binding

Congratulations, your bias binding is finished and ready to use! Enjoy.

 

How to make your own DIY Bias Binding

Bias binding - download


Oooh yay! Another two patterns updated and all snazzy & new 🙂

This time it’s the Emily dress and the Abigail tunic top. They used to be hand-drawn but are now all digital, crisp, clear and beautiful. They’ve been tested, adjusted and edited to within an inch of their lives. And are now ready!

Sooooo if you’d like to try them, you can get them on sale for only $4.50 each for the next 24 hours. Horrays!

The Emily dress 0-24 months
The Emily dress 2-12 years
The Abigail tunic top 0-24 months
The Abigail tunic top 2-12 years
Happy sewing,
Rebecca x

PS… if you’d like to test the new upcoming patterns I’ve got coming out, make sure to join our facebook group to get notifications of the testing calls:https://www.facebook.com/groups/mummykinsandme/

 

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