Posted on

DIY Art Smock Hack – How to Turn the Lucy Dress Into an Art Smock

Hi! Today we are going to take the Lucy dress and make a DIY art smock. I’ll be showing you how to do it unlined. but if you want to line it you can follow the pattern directions for doing so with a few little add ons shown here.

First, let’s talk about material options. Since these will be used for art projects I would suggest using a home decor weight thicker cotton woven (which is what I used in the tutorial. You could also use a laminated cotton or oilcloth if you need it to be waterproof. I find the home decor cotton holds up well to marker and paints (as in they don’t go through easily to the other side) and it is a fairly inexpensive option as well.

After you have your pattern pieces cut, we are going to make pockets. I made one big pocket by just cutting 2 pieces of the fabric in a pocket shape and stitching right sides together, then clip corners and turn, top stitch along the top getting your opening closed. and attaching to the front of the art smock by sewing around the sides and bottom. I also did a long rectangle pocket for holding a couple brushes in. For this pocket I just folded under the 3 sides and sewed to the front and then sewed a line down the middle of the pocket to divide it for 2 brushes.

Now sew your shoulder seams attaching the backs to the front, open up your seams and we will be attaching bias tape to the armholes. I prefer the sandwich method here as it is an art smock, and if you are using a laminated or oilcloth fabric sandwich method will be your friend!

Once that is done we are going to attach bias tape to the sides and around the neckline. If you are using oilcloth or laminated fabric you will also want to attach it along the bottom, So I hope you have a lot of bias tape!

Since I used home decor weight, I simply folded and hemmed the bottom of the art smock.

Now attach a snap (or button if you prefer) for keeping the smock closed. I always choose snaps because buttons get tangled in her hair so very easily.

Easy peasy and ready to art! Now I cannot wait for summer to happen so I can make Lucy as a crop top for the kids!

 

Posted on

Two hacks for the Comfy Cowl Hoodie! How to add thumbholes and side seam pockets

Hey all! Jeanine here again – and this time I’m going to be using the free pocket pattern from Mummykins and Me on the comfy cowl – AND showing you how to add thumbholes and do a thumb cuff!!!! Because hoodies really should have thumb cuffs – keeps hands warm during wintery weather! Or you could even use add a thumbhole cuff to our gorgeous new Dreamy Drape Top.

What you’ll need:

Adding a side seam pocket

The pocket add on is really quite easy, very standard on front and back pieces place pocket right sides down about an inch up from the bottom, and sew and finish along the side edge.

You could do this on either the Comfy Cowl, or the waistband version of the Dreamy Drape.

Then place front and back together and sew up the side as usual – just going around the pockets as well.

and side pockets are all good to go! Easy peasy 🙂

Now Let’s move onto thumb cuffs… a little less easy peasy – but not tooooo bad and there is a video as well as pictures!

How to add thumbholes

For thumb cuffs we are going to start with doubling the height of your cuff pieces

then fold it in half hot dog ways and divide into quarters.

Now sew that middle quarter section. (I kinda scribbled it above.

Now after that middle section is sewed bring the sides together – left side to left side and right side to right side

Now on both the left side and the right side you will sew from that last quarter line to meet up exactly with the previous stitching – but do not go over it.

So now it will look like this – just those end flaps left open on both sides. We are almost done.

Now you are going to flip so you can open up and match those last quarters together. Match the stitching in the middle and then you will sew down one side and up the other!

Now you are done your sewing! So, turn that sucker right side out!

ta – da! Were you a bit nervous it wasn’t going to turn out? I was … Thumb cuffs are a lot of brain work!

Now you are going to stitch that cuff onto your comfy cowl as per the pattern directions!

Thumb cuff comfy cowl is a BIG hit in this house!

And if you prefer a video, here’s how I did it step-by-step – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gpoaWDGusY

Leave me a comment – did you enjoy the photo tutorial? or prefer the video? What pattern would you like to see hacked next?

 I hope you all enjoyed my Canadian accent!

Posted on

HACK: The Teatime Romper – Pleat Detail


Hey all! Jeanine here today to show you how I got the pleat detail front on the top!

There is the easy way – and the much harder and more confusing way that you use if you are tight on fabric and home bound thanks to a blizzard.

First off, you’ll need the Teatime Romper sewing pattern. If you haven’t got it yet, you can get it from – http://rebecca-page.com/product/romper-pdf-sewing-pattern/.

Let’s start with the very easy way to get pleat room – Add 3-4 inches to the top of the pattern piece – or more if you want a LOT of pleats… but honestly since the Teatime Romper is a gathered front I think keeping the pleats to just a handful is optimal.

and then you fold and iron, fold and iron until you get down to where the romper front is the height of the original pattern piece.

**I strongly recommend sewing the pleats down on the inside – where you won’t see the stitching from the front so they don’t go all poofed out when you thread the elastic through for the front.

Then do a basting stitch along the sides of your pleats to keep them down.

The hard way is cutting a separate rectangle that is 5 inches tall, pleating it down to 3 and cutting 3″ off the top of the bodice front. Did that confuse you? It made my brain hurt just trying to type it – but at the time I was able to visualize it so easily. I took pics since it shows the pleating cleaner.

And then basted down the sides and sewn on.

With a little trim to hide the fact that I added on a section for the pleats instead of doing things the proper way and cutting it longer to pleat. Just goes to show you there is indeed more than one way to (metaphorically) skin a cat… What a horrible saying that is …. If you have a better one for me to use – please – leave a comment!

Once again, just to be clear, sew those pleats down!!!! Otherwise they will become lost once the elastic is in place!